Vienna Regulator. Viennese Wall Clock. Ca. 1860

This clock is a time only Vienna Regulator (Vienna wall clock or Viennese wall clock in the U.K.)

Viennese Wall Clock Vienna Regulator

Lots of work to do on this one…way more that I thought when I purchased it.

The case needs to be reworked as sometime down the line attempts at resotration have been poorly done. The door hinges are not original, nor are they remotely similar to the originals. The joints are badly glued or screwed together… You get the picture.

The movement also had a major problem. When I inspected it, I found that the click spring was broken, not a particularly bad problem with most clocks. However, with this one, the click spring is part of the winding barrel assembly. A new click spring was not an option.

I had to decide whether to a) attempt to repair the existing broken spring; or B) modify the original assembly and add a new spring at another location (but space was limited to do this). I decided to go forward with plan A, thinking that if it went wrong I could always fall back on plan B.

I started by cutting a small slither of brass from stock and basically filing it into the proper bowed shape. Then, I soft-soldered it in place and finished filing it to fit. All these repairs were done using only a small vice and needle files. The results are quite sufficient.

We have a supplemental post with further commentary on this project.

We have a few other clocks along these lines for those interested:

2 responses to “Vienna Regulator. Viennese Wall Clock. Ca. 1860

  1. Amilcar Guimarães NAWCC #0012379 BHI # 17620

    Well, the best solution for this problem is to make a new spring using the old one as a model. Even if you do not have the broken part, is possible to use the contour that normally is “imprinted on the surface o the wheel. Since these springs are not too strong, you may use a sheet of brass, provide you harden it hitting with hammer blows manny times. Brass is hardened using this procedure.Use the same rivetting hole and keep the sping and rivet head at the same hight, to avoid touching the above weel.
    Cut the shape and make the rivet hole after hardening it.
    I have seen many Viennas with contant force springs made originally in brass. Good luck and let me know your results. RGD, AGS.

  2. Amilcar Guimarães NAWCC #0012379 BHI # 17620

    Well, the best solution for this problem is to make a new spring using the old one as a model. Even if you do not have the broken part, is possible to use the contour that normally is “imprinted on the surface o the wheel. Since these springs are not too strong, you may use a sheet of brass, provide you harden it hitting with hammer blows manny times. Brass is hardened using this procedure.Use the same rivetting hole and keep the sping and rivet head at the same hight, to avoid touching the above weel.
    Cut the shape and make the rivet hole after hardening it.
    I have seen many Viennas with constant force springs made originally in brass. Good luck and let me know your results. RGD, AGS.

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