Top Half Gledhill Brook Time Recorder. 1920’s.

This is the Top Half Gledhill Brook Time Recorder is the first time recorder I ever purchased.

Top Half Gledhill Brook

I knew nothing about time recorders, so I thought I was buying a wall clock. At some point in time, someone has cut the base off which contained the time recording mechanism.

1/2 Gledhill Brook labelI have an original (intact) example of one of these clocks in my collection. They are fitted with a very high quality, massive ‘Fusee’ movement. Gledhill Brook unquestionably fitted their clocks with the best movements of any time recorder manufacturer in the world.

The cases however are very basic in design. Solid oak, not very ornate. This clock actually makes quite a decent wall clock and I will one day get around to finishing the case as the person who cut off the base left it rather unfinished.

The pendulum was not correct when I purchased this clock. I am resident in the US and I found an original pendulum for sale on eBay in the UK. A friend of mine was scheduled to visit me and guess what he had to drag halfway around the world!! ….Thanks Steve!!

The only downside to this clock is the fact that even without the base it still weighs almost 40lbs!

Fusee Movement:
The fusee is a device for obtaining a constant driving torque from a spring as it uncoils. It has been widely employed in clocks, watches and chronometers.

It consists of a tapering drum with a spiral groove cut in it, and the pull of the mainspring is exerted through a cord or chain which is unwound from this groove on to the outside of the drum or ‘barrel’ containing the spring. When the spring is fully wound and exerting its greatest pull, the cord is unwinding from the smaller end of the fusee, where it has only a small leverage. When the spring is nearly run down, the chain pulls at the wider end of the fusee, with a greater leverage. By suitably shaping the fusee, the torque on its axis can be made quite uniform for all states of the spring.

One response to “Top Half Gledhill Brook Time Recorder. 1920’s.

  1. With regard to the wire that connects to the large weight on the fusse movement, Can anyone tell me what does this do and is it a critical part to keep the clock running.
    I saw somewhere that this has to be moved or adjusted every time the clock is wound, but cant think where i saw it.

    The weight drops with an almighty clunk at 9 minutes to 12 twice a day.Is this correct or should it do it at a different time and if so how do i adjust it

    any help appreciated.
    anthony

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