Update on the Simplex Time Recorder repair.

Here’s an update on our simplex time recorder repair. I have completed the disassembly, cleaning, and reassembly of the time recorder mechanism in what’s turned out to be a rather complex Simplex punch clock. Prior to disassembling, I cleaned the recorder with a degreasing agent to remove most of the heavy grease and dirt. This revealed the details of the smaller parts often hidden under years of built up grime.

Simplex time recorder Before cleaning

I was unable to find any literature on this time recorder mechanism on the web. These mechanisms are quite unique and very complex. There were many variations manufactured, so I had no references available if I ran into difficulties on the reassembly. Therefore, I photographed (as well as taking some video) every step of the disassembly process.

disassembled Simplex time recorder mechanism

disassembled Simplex time recorder mechanism

I prefer to reassemble a complex item such as this whilst the disassembly is still fresh in my mind. As such, I tend to approach these jobs with a somewhat fanatical attitude. My goal is to work on it continuously until completion, much to the chagrin of my dear wife. I started the project on a Friday and finished it by Sunday afternoon. It was a marathon operation!

All the rust was removed, the cast-iron frame was repainted and all the bright-work polished.

The reassembly went well, thanks to my meticulous photo / video documentation. As you can see from the before / after photos, the project was well worth the work.

Simple time recorder mechanism after cleaning

Simplex time recorder mechanism after cleaning

The actual clock movement looked to have had the winding arbor bushings replaced and the entire movement was spotlessly clean. I had little to do to it other than oiling and a quick tune up to get the clock in beat.

As with many time recorders, the connecting rode that connects the movement to the time recording device was missing. I had a spare one, but it was shorter than the one needed for this clock. I cut it in two and used a brass sleeve soldered into place to extend its length.

[slideshow id=3314649325776021562&w=426&h=320]

The case was polished and the movement and recording mechanism were refitted into the case. The dial is still at the ‘Dial House’ pending restoration.

5 responses to “Update on the Simplex Time Recorder repair.

  1. These are very cool. I’ve seen these many times at sales but never thought of them as being useful and/or collectible. Very informative.

  2. Pingback: Finishing up Simplex Time Recorder « Due Time

  3. Hi-

    I am in the process of restoring a 1926 ITR time clock and like yours my connecting rod is missing. Is there any way you could provide me with a picture of what it looks like so I can try and build one?

    Regards,

    Scott
    scott.coverley@gmail.com

    • I have a couple of Simplex time recorders. Both have different length control rods. I would suggest fabricating yours the same way I did. I installed the clock movement and the recording mechanism. Then I measured the distance between the two receiver sleeves and built the rod to fit that distance. I would do this because there were dozens of different lengths made if you cut a rod to my specs, the chances are it won’t fit your time recorder..

  4. Hi, I was admiring your Simplex wall time recorder . I have one and it is hanging on the wall in my man room. I have been curious to know what the electrical connections are on the inside as it also has a small light socket in-side the cabinet. There are some time cards in the cabinet and they have an address from Calif. and a hotel name. This clock is impressive and I would be glad to send you a picture if you are interested in seeing it . I would like to find out if there is any value to this clock. Thanks Charles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *