Tag Archives: advertising clock

Store Regulator Calendar Clock. ca 1880.

I’m not sure exactly who made this store regulator calendar clock (possibly Waterbury). I write often that I don’t have many American clocks in my collection, but as I document them, I find I have far more than I realized!

Store Regulator with Calendar. ca 1880.

Store Regulator with Calendar. ca 1880.

I have two calendar clocks in my collection and I am hoping to add a double dial clock to my collection eventually. This clock is in fair condition. It was the first calendar movement I worked on. It is a simple modification driven from the hour tube.

Advertisement Clocks

Many of these clocks have permanent advertisements on the glass, this one has clips around the inside of the glass door indicating that this model used replaceable paper advertisements posted on the inside of the glass….I wish I had some of those old posters.

read more

Simplex Time Recorder. 1920’s. Lightweight Time Recorder.

A nice, clean Simplex Time Recorder.

Simplex Time Recorder. 1920’s.

Simplex Time Recorder. 1920’s.

The first time recorder I added to my collection. This is the smallest of my punch clocks. At 40 lbs., this is a lightweight, considering the fact that some of my other punch clocks weigh-in at almost 90 lbs. Mind you, I have never hung a time recorder on the wall!!

Relationship Building

One reason we love time recorders so much is because of the daily personal relationships we like to imagine hundreds of employees having had with these machines once upon a time. A child can have a fond memory of laying on their grandparents’ living room floor listening to the rhythmic tick tock of a mantel clock and feeling peace. A wife can remember the long, slow gong of the grandfather clock in the hallway the moment she received news on the telephone of her husband’s passing.

read more

E.N. Welch Clock. Gallery Clock. 1800’s.

I don’t have much info on this E.N. Welch Clock , but my best guess is that it dates from the late 1800’s.

E.N. Welch Clock. Gallery Clock. 1800’s.

Gallery Clock. 1800’s.

When this one strikes the hour, the sound of the gong is almost drowned out by the noise of the gears clattering as they spin. . . Terrible bloody racket!

The clock is American. You can find an in depth write up about the history of this clock company with the Antique Clock Guys. Other sites will direct you to a history of the New Haven Clock Company which is not accurate. We have a couple of  New Haven clocks in our collection; they are much nicer than this one.

read more

Waterbury Clock. Store Regulator. Late 1800’s.

I had to replace the face on this Waterbury Clock because the original was beyond repair.

Waterbury Clock. Store Regulator. Late 1800’s.

Waterbury Clock. Store Regulator. Late 1800’s.

I used a paper face replacement. The clock is a typical store advertising clock.

Advertising Clocks

Some of these clocks have product names printed on the glass. These were mass produced clocks. As such, the cases and movements are obviously of a much lesser quality than, say, office or school house regulators.

The term ‘advertising clock’ is not germane to this make and model of clock as advertising clocks have been produced throughout the ages in all shapes and sizes. This is a more traditional store clock that may have some sort of advertising on the class. In this case, the generic horological term ‘regulator’ appears.

read more

French Wall clock. Late1800’s.

I don’t have much info on this one.

French(?) Wall Clock

French(?) Wall Clock

Not even certain that it is French – may be German.

I don’t think the crown is original. The movement is in nice condition. Porcelain face and matching pendulum.

The letters R/A appear in the center of the pendulum. R/A stands for Advance and Retard. This is for adjusting the clock, indicating that one should turn the pendulum adjustment knob toward the R (anti-clockwise) to slow the time and toward the A (clockwise) to advance the time. This action simply lowers or raises the pendulum bob thus speeding up or slowing the pendulum swing.

read more

Wag Clock. Probably German. Early 1900s. Know anything about it?

This is what is referred to as a wag clock.

German wag clock

German ‘wag’ clock.

I don’t know much about this clock. I believe it’s German, possibly early 1900’s. The pendulum and face appear to match, as does the crown. Overall, a very nice piece.

Know anything about it?

I’ve seen some clocks characterized as German Wag Clocks, but they are of a very different sort, gaudily painted front faces and no real case to speak of. This lovely wooden case is much more sophisticated and tasteful than those, but they may very well have the same origins or be in the same family. I’d be curious to know what you know about them.

read more